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1. YYC Collaborative Diversity

According to The City of Calgary’s website, in 2015 artists hired by The Public Art Program included 78 per cent local artists; although, there has been back-lash at some of the recent art that has erected.  One example is Bow Fort Towers at Canada Olympic Park, for the money spent to hire artists outside of the community, as well as the location of the towers not being in a place where it stands out enough to be appreciated.

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi, who won his third term in the 2017 election, has acknowledge that an increase of communication, from officials to community and back, is a priority in this area going forward.

Nenshi also responded the latest U.S. presidential win and was quoted in the Calgary Herald on Jan. 20, 2017  saying,” Let’s ensure that we are open to the world, to trade, to brains, to money, to ideas; and make sure that we seize on this opportunity.”

The Calgary art appreciation issue will not be resolved with an “agree to disagree” solution.  It requires an environment of consensus in order to reach, and to seize, the highest possible potential all around.

“Let’s ensure that we are open to the world, to trade, to brains, to money, to ideas; and make sure that we seize on this opportunity.”

Keeping money circulating and flowing into the city and surrounding areas calls for a continued balanced economic distribution, with the understanding that for any consumer to spend money there must be a win-win.  This means that the artist gets paid, and the spender will receive value for the dollars spent.

City art and entertainment are not only important for tourism, but for the  joy of its taxpayers.

Art is often created as a tangible legacy to honour, or as memorabilia; or to create a  visual, auditory, or emotional impact on those who recognize it – whether it is displayed in a home or in a public park.

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